Minimalism

So You’ve Downsized…Now What? How Minimalists Can Avoid Boredom

So you've downsized and embraced the minimalist lifestyle. Here's what to do when you start to get bored!

After reading through the responses from my reader survey at the end of the year, I realized there were quite a few people wondering what to do after downsizing and embracing the minimalist lifestyle.

So you've downsized and embraced the minimalist lifestyle. Here's what to do when you start to get bored!

In particular, one person asked the following:

What do I do after the decluttering steps of downsizing possessions? Minimalist blogs talk about all this free time they have now and living an intentional life but I just feel bored!

First of all, I love the honesty in this question. I’m sure minimalism comes across as boring and uninteresting to many people (and even I tend to find minimalist blogs a little uninspiring), and it’s not surprising that those who embrace it end up getting bored at one point or another.

If you’re someone who’s feeling a little stuck with this lifestyle or you’re not feeling like it’s what you hoped for, I have a few tips up my sleeve for you!

How Minimalists Can Avoid Boredom

So you've downsized and embraced the minimalist lifestyle. Here's what to do when you start to get bored!

Shift Your Mindset

We often embrace minimalism the opposite way than we ought to. We think about what to get rid of, rather than focusing on what to keep. If we all started our journey focusing on the positive space and what we wanted to keep and even add to it, the process would be a bit different. Obviously we can’t go back in time and start the process again, but it really does help to shift your mindset to think about what you want in your life rather than what you don’t want.

I’ve pointed this out a few times because it’s a common misconception about minimalism, and I’ll say it again: minimalism is not about getting rid of stuff. Decluttering is a tool that can bring you closer toward a minimalist lifestyle, but decluttering is not equal to minimalism. Just remember that minimalism is about making space for what’s important, yo.

Assess What You Kept

Once you’ve started to downsize and are on the road to a more minimalistic lifestyle, it’s so important to also evaluate and recognize the things in your life that were valuable enough that you kept them. We often forget to look for the obvious signs that indicate our passions and purpose, and we spend our whole lives wondering if we’re headed the right direction.

Did you keep art projects from school, exercise equipment, old journals full of memories? These can all be indications of your passions and things you should pursue further. Of course there are the material possessions you keep out of necessity (or if they sparked joy à la Marie Kondo), but you want to also look at the people and activities you decided to keep in your life.

Add In Some Goodness

Have a brainstorming session to think about what you want your life to be filled with. Maybe you want to travel, learn new skills, volunteer, read more, do more yoga, or spend quality time with your family. You might even want to add more friendships into your life, so try finding activities that would support that (volunteering, meetups, blogging, clubs, etc). Have a good hard think about what would bring you the most joy!

P.S. You can also start thinking about things you might want to save up for, such as a quality pair of boots or a gym membership (newsflash: minimalists still buy things!) Since you’re probably being more selective about how you spend your money, it helps to make a wishlist in order to avoid impulse buys.

Do you have any tips for avoiding boredom after downsizing? Let us know in the comments below!

Want blissful tips in your inbox?

Sign up for The Blissful Mind email list, and you'll get even more content to help you slow down, de-stress, and add a practical dose of mindfulness into your day!

I won't send you spam. Pinky swear. Powered by ConvertKit
Catherine Beard
Hi, I'm Catherine! The Blissful Mind is your guide to being the calmest, healthiest, most productive version of yourself. Whether you're trying to slow down, de-stress, or feel more content, I’m here to help make life a little less complicated.
  • Wonderful post!

    Often, after making a positive change in my life, I hit a moment of feeling uncomfortable about the goodness. It’s not just boredom, but also anxiety can creep in, too.

    I find it helpful to notice these feelings and take some time to sit with them and try to figure out what they’re trying to tell me, what hidden assumptions I might be able to uncover that will keep me from falling back into old habits.

    • Thank you, Barb! Anxiety can definitely creep up, especially if you compare your journey to someone else’s. It’s so important to be aware of your feelings and dig deep about what they mean! xo

  • These are some really great ideas! Thanks for sharing them!

  • Minimalism is about what you keep. That is a GREAT way to frame it. Keep what is important.

  • Mark Lowe

    In my own minimalist lifestyle I love the opportunity to be mindful. Good heavens if a person really has that much free time they should write book, start a blog, volunteer, sit in nature, read, play with their kids, visit their parents, travel. I could go on!
    Great post.
    Mark
    https://minimalistlifestyle.wordpress.com/

  • For me, minimalism is all about having what you love in your life and not what you don’t. Totally understand where they are coming from about the time thing; when first starting out I had no idea what to do with my spare time! Now I use that extra time doing what I love, blogging, planning travel, family time, working out.
    Great article and great question!
    Lisa x​
    lisavillaume.com

    • Those are all great things to do with your spare time! I definitely use it for blogging and working out. Much better use of time than shopping haha xx

  • Pamela

    Minimiliasm is about thinking about what you keep. I think being intentional about what you spend money on is important. I think I am more of a minimialist, but my spouse likes to spend money more than I do. Its hard but we try and find a compromise. If it was 100% my way we would be spending less.